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18 September 2012

UK Drones


UK Drones

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A Royal Air Force Reaper UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) from 39 Squadron, makes its approach to Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan following a mission. The aircraft, armed with Paveway bombs and Hellfire missiles, is remotely controlled from Kandahar for takeoff and landing and by British troops in Nevada, USA during the actual sortie. 1 November 2010. MoD

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This image shows Reaper a Remotely Piloted Air System (RPAS), part of 39 Squadron Royal Air Force. The Reaper has completed 20,000 operational flight hours in theatre, and is operated from Kandahar Air Field (KAF) in Afghanistan. Reaper is a medium-to-high altitude, long endurance Remotely Piloted Air System (RPAS). The Reaper's primary mission is to act as an Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) asset, employing sensors to provide real-time data to commanders and intelligence specialists at all levels. Febraury 28, 2011. MoD

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A Reaper Remotely Piloted Air System (RPAS) comes into land at Kandahar Airbase in Helmand, Afghanistan. Breaking new ground for the RAF, the MQ-9 Reaper has become an invaluable asset in the fight against terrorism in Afghanistan. It is able to spend great lengths of time silently observing the enemy before using a range of precision munitions to defend coalition troops and civilians from danger. This image was a runner-up in the RAF 2011 Photographic Competititon. January 5, 2011. MoD

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A pilot from 39 Sqn remotely controls a Reaper MQ-9 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, during a training sortie over the west coast of America from Creech Air Force Base. UAV's can be remotely piloted on Operation Herrick in Afghanistan from half way around the world at Creech AFB. 39 Sqn who are parented by RAF Waddington in the UK currently have around 70 personnel based in Nevada covering all trades from pilots to administration staff. March 19, 2009. MoD

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A Reaper MQ-9 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operated by 39 Squadron of the Royal Air Force, awaits take off from Creech Air Force Bace, Nevada prior to a training mission over the west coast of America. 39 Sqn, who are parented by RAF Waddington in the UK, currently have around 70 personnel based in Nevada covering all trades from Pilots to admin staff. March 19, 2009. MoD

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Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Watchkeeper makes it's first flight in the UK. The new UAV flew for the first time in the UK on 14 April 2010, taking off from dedicated facilities at Parc Aberporth in West Wales for a 20-minute flight. Watchkeeper provides enhanced UAV capability that will enable commanders to detect and track targets for long periods, without the need to deploy troops into potentially sensitive or dangerous areas. The system is capable of rapid deployment and operations anywhere in the world and will support the information requirements of all three services. April 13, 2012. MoD

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A soldier of Bravo Company, 1 Rifles is pictured manning a Desert Hawk UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) from a remote controlling unit in Afghanistan. Desert Hawk is a portable UAV surveillance system which provides aerial video reconnaissance. It has a flight time of approximately one hour, and can fly anywhere within a 10km radius of its ground control station. It has both day and night time (thermal imaging) capability. The equipment can be used for a variety of tasks, such as force protection for convoys and patrols, route clearance, base security, reconnaissance or target tracking. The operator is able to view and record data in real time and act upon any hostile activity that the UAV encounters. March 20, 2009. MoD

[Image]A soldier of Bravo Company, 1 Rifles launches a Desert Hawk UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) from a WMIK Landrover during an operation near Garmsir, Afghanistan. Desert Hawk is a portable UAV surveillance system which provides aerial video reconnaissance. It has a flight time of approximately one hour, and can fly anywhere within a 10km radius of its ground control station. It has both day and night time (thermal imaging) capability. The equipment can be used for a variety of tasks, such as force protection for convoys and patrols, route clearance, base security, reconnaissance or target tracking. March 20, 2009. MoD

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A soldier of the Royal Artillery launches a Desert Hawk UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) during Operation Ghartse Dagger in Helmand, Afghanistan. Desert Hawk is a portable UAV surveillance system which provides aerial video reconnaissance. It has a flight time of approximately one hour, and can fly anywhere within a 10km radius of its ground control station. It has both day and night time (thermal imaging) capability. The equipment can be used for a variety of tasks, such as force protection for convoys and patrols, route clearance, base security, reconnaissance or target tracking. March 5, 2008. MoD

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The Unmanned Aerial System, Predator aircraft ready for take-off on the runway. Set up in January 2004 as an urgent operational requirement to support coalition operations in the Multi-National Division (South East) or MND (SE) of Iraq, 1115 Flight consists of 45 predominantly Royal Air Force personnel comprising pilots, sensor operators, engineers and other support personnel. The pilots and sensor operators work round-the-clock at Ground Control Stations housed at Nellis Air Force Base whilst the engineers are based at Creech Air Force Base both of which are in Nevada USA. Flying the Predator Unmanned Aerial System, they provide vital persistent, wide-area surveillance to support troops on the ground in both Iraq and Afghanistan. If called upon to do so they can also provide close air support, video support of surface actions, air strike coordination, and direct fire support. May 24, 2006. MoD