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10 November 2005

Captions by Associated Press.
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** EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT ** The bodies of unidentified victims lie outside the Days Inn hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005. Suicide bombers simultaneously attacked three hotels frequented by foreigners in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, killing at least 53 people and injuring more than 300, Jordan's deputy prime minister said. One police official said they appeared to be al-Qaida attacks.(AP Photo/ Petra, Jordanian News Agency)

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** EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENTS ** Foreigners attempt to help a wounded man as other dead and injured lie around outside the Days Inn hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005. Suicide bombers simultaneously attacked three hotels frequented by foreigners in Jordan's capital killing at least 53 people and injuring more than 300, Jordan's deputy prime minister said. One police official said they appeared to be al-Qaida attacks.(AP Photo/ Petra)

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** EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENTS ** The body of an unidentified victim is carried out of the Days Inn hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005.Suicide bombers simultaneously attacked three hotels frequented by foreigners in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, killing at least 53 people and injuring more than 300, Jordan's deputy prime minister said. One police official said they appeared to be al-Qaida attacks.(AP Photo/ Petra)

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The bodies of two unidentified victims lie outside the Days Inn hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005. Suicide bombers simultaneously attacked three hotels frequented by foreigners in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, killing at least 53 people and injuring more than 300, Jordan's deputy prime minister said. One police official said they appeared to be al-Qaida attacks.(AP Photo/ Petra, Jordanian News Agency)

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The bodys of unidentified victims are seen outside the Days Inn hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005.Suicide bombers simultaneously attacked three hotels frequented by foreigners in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, killing at least 53 people and injuring more than 300, Jordan's deputy prime minister said. One police official said they appeared to be al-Qaida attacks.(AP Photo/ Petra, Jordanian News Agency)

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The bodies of two unidentified victims lie outside the Days Inn hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005.Suicide bombers simultaneously attacked three hotels frequented by foreigners in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, killing at least 53 people and injuring more than 300, Jordan's deputy prime minister said. One police official said they appeared to be al-Qaida attacks.(AP Photo/ Petra, Jordanian News Agency)

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Jordanian civilians and policemen helps an injured man in front of the Grand Hyatt hotel hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005. Killing at least 18 people, and injuring more than 120. The explosions struck the Grand Hyatt, Radisson SAS and Days Inn hotels. A police officer at the Radisson site said it was caused "apparently by a bomb." (AP Photo/Nader Daoud)

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Image from television shows an exterior view of the entrance to the Radisson hotel in Amman Jordan, one of there hotels attacked by suspected suicide bombers, Wednesday evening Nov 9 2005. At least 52 people have been killed and more than 120 were injured in the explosions. The Radisson explosion ripped through a banqueting room where about 250 people were attending a wedding reception. (AP Photo/ APTN) **TV OUT **

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Police guard the entrance of a shattered front to the Hyatt hotel in Amman, Jordan, approximately one hour after a bomb exploded in the main lobby, Wednesday Nov 9 2005. Suicide bombers carried out nearly simultaneous attacks on three U.S.-based hotels in the Jordanian capital Wednesday night, killing at least 57 people and wounding 115 in what appeared to be an al-Qaida assault on an Arab kingdom with close ties to the United States. (AP Photo/ James Kolpi)

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Jordanian policeman stand guard outside the Radisson hotel in Amman after three explosions rocked three hotels in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005. Suicide bombers simultaneously attacked three hotels frequented by foreigners in Jordan's capital late Wednesday, killing at least 53 people and injuring more than 300, Jordan's deputy prime minister said. One police official said they appeared to be al-Qaida attacks.(AP Photo/ Muhammad Al-Kisswani)

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The main entrance of Radisson SAS Hotel in Amman after an explosion believed to have killed at least five people and wounded 20 others, Wednesday Nov 9 2005. Explosions rocked three hotels in the Jordanian capital late Wednesday, killing at least 18 people, injuring more than 120.(AP Photo/Nader Daoud)

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Image from television shows a view of the lobby of the Radisson hotel in Amman Jordan, one of three hotels attacked by suspected suicide bombers, Wednesday evening Nov 9 2005. At least 52 people have been killed and more than 120 were injured in the explosions. The Radisson explosion ripped through a banqueting room where about 250 people were attending a wedding reception. (AP Photo/ APTN) **TV OUT **

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Image from television shows an unidentified man being escorted away from the Radisson hotel in Amman Jordan, one of three hotels attacked by suspected suicide bombers, Wednesday evening Nov 9 2005. At least 52 people have been killed and more than 120 were injured in the explosions. The Radisson explosion ripped through a banqueting room where about 250 people were attending a wedding reception. (AP Photo/ APTN) ** TV OUT **

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Image from television shows a view of a function room of the Radisson hotel in Amman, Jordan, one of there hotels attacked by suspected suicide bombers, Wednesday evening Nov 9 2005. At least 52 people have been killed and more than 120 were injured in the explosions. The Radisson explosion ripped through a banqueting room where about 250 people were attending a wedding reception. (AP Photo/ APTN) **TV OUT **

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Joseph-Abu-Kali, of Amman rallies onlookers down the street from the Grand Hyatt hotel near the third circle in Amman, Jordan, where a bomb exploded in the lobby of the hotel at 9 p.m. on Wednesday Nov. 9, 2005. The group chanted that those who died in the bombings should go to heaven and that 'God loves Jordan.' Suicide bombers carried out nearly simultaneous attacks on three U.S.-based hotels in the Jordanian capital Wednesday night, killing at least 57 people and wounding 115 in what appeared to be an al-Qaida assault on an Arab kingdom with close ties to the United States.(AP Photo/ Jim Korpi )

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Jordan's Prince Regent, Hashem Ibn Al- Hussein, second from right, visits an injured Jordanian in Amman, Wednesday Nov 9 2005. Suicide bombers carried out nearly simultaneous attacks on three U.S.-based hotels in the Jordanian capital Wednesday night, killing at least 57 people and wounding 115 in what appeared to be an al-Qaida assault on an Arab kingdom with close ties to the United States. (AP Photo/ Petra, Jordanian News Agency)