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6 March 2005


Database of 3,646 US chemical plants in 2003: http://cryptome.org/chem/chemicals.zip (Zipped DBF, 284KB)


Source: Wall Street Journal, May 21, 2003

5 March 2005

The New York Times reports today on the dispute over removing sensitive information about hazardous facilities:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/05/national/05secret.html

Efforts to Hide Sensitive Data Pit 9/11 Concerns Against Safety

By CHRISTOPHER DREW

[Excerpts]

The dispute illustrates a growing push to mask sensitive data about the nation's industrial base from the prying eyes of potential terrorists. In the tug of war over tank cars and other industrial information, critics question whether the move toward secrecy is overwhelming safety concerns and even chilling debates over how to eliminate the vulnerabilities.

People who live near chemical and nuclear plants, dams and oil and gas pipelines complain that it has become harder to find out about disaster plans and environmental hazards, and some have sued for more information. Engineering reports have been stripped from government Web sites, and several agencies are creating new controls on sensitive information that go far beyond the wide-ranging classification system built in the cold war.

Federal officials say although they are trying to strike a reasonable balance, some clashes are inevitable, and more are likely to occur. If delicate information leaks out, "it gives our adversaries too much of a picture of what our vulnerabilities are," Jack L. Johnson Jr., chief security officer at the Department of Homeland Security, said.

Internal government e-mail messages show that months before the train bombings last March in Madrid, transportation officials stopped the Defense Intelligence Agency from releasing a report on rail vulnerabilities in the United States.

The messages, which were obtained by The New York Times from a former federal official, show that the report was intended to spark debate among officials on improving rail security. But after complaints from the industry, one senior transportation official helped block the report by arguing that if it became public "I could foresee this paper being a handout in the next session of Al Qaeda's rail-attack course."

Another hot area of debate over secrecy is the atomic energy industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stashed away an enormous trove of documents about nuclear power plants, suspending access to much of its Web site while weeding out reports that might aid terrorists.

A spokeswoman for the commission, Sue F. Gagner, said that access to 380,000 documents was suspended last October and that 120,000 had been made available again.

"We think it's very important to be diligent about having information that could potentially be helpful to a terrorist," Ms. Gagner said.

"You can hide the information, but if the vulnerability still exists, the bad guys will find it," said Gary D. Bass, executive director of OMB Watch, a group in Washington that supports more openness. "So let's reduce the vulnerability instead."

Officials said many companies had long resisted disclosing security flaws to the government out of fear of leaks. Mr. Johnson said that the department was blending what it obtained from the companies with intelligence about terrorist intentions and that it intended to share much of that analysis with local officials who agree to keep it confidential.

Sometimes the battles are more visible. Since chlorine leaking from a derailed tank car killed nine people and injured hundreds last month in South Carolina, the fight over the railroad placards has emerged as the most potent symbol of the debate.

The Homeland Security and Transportation Departments have been considering whether to remove the placards since August.

Firefighters, railroad workers and large chemical companies are adamant about keeping the placards. Statistics show that chemicals leak from dozens of rail cars a year and that deaths occur periodically.

The railroads also say they are working to create a system that meets security and safety needs.

But two studies by the Transportation Department have shown that the alternatives, electronic systems that could transmit lists of chemicals on a train by radio or satellite, would be more expensive, cumbersome and less effective on safety. Texas A&M University is finishing another study.

Jamie Conrad, a lawyer for the American Chemistry Council, which lobbies for large chemical makers, said he could see how a placard might "advertise a little bit" the best cars to attack.

"But where we come down is that if you take it off, you know that people will be killed in accidents," Mr. Conrad said. "And you're basically balancing that against the theoretical prospect that terrorists might be lurking on that corner."

Most of the addresses of dangerous chemical facilities listed below are available online through Google. A few could not be verified and are marked [?] to show best guess of location. Errata welcomed, send to jya@pipeline.com

Anhydrous ammonia is the chemical most commonly listed due to the huge amount produced by the industry, primarily for fertilizer and a variety of other uses including explosives. Other chemicals are equally or more lethal in smaller amounts. See state listings for other wider range of chemical hazards from which the list below is derived:

http://cryptome.org/chem/chem-danger.htm

As noted in the file above thanks to the State PIRGs and the Wayback Machine for providing this information.



Eyeballing
the
51 Most Dangerous US Chemical Facilities

Storing the largest amounts of extremely hazardous substances.*
*Extremely hazardous substances as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Air Act, Section 112(r).
State Facility Name
Terraserver Aerial Photo/Topographical Map
City Maximum amount in a single process (lbs) Chemical

AK

ALASKA NITROGEN PRODUCTS LLC KENAI 150,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
AL OLIN CORPORATION MCINTOSH, ALABAMA PLANT MCINTOSH 31,000,000 Chlorine
AR TERRA NITROGEN LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, BLYTHEVILLE BLYTHEVILLE 90,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
AZ APACHE NITROGEN PRODUCTS, INC. BENSON 9,175,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
CA CALAMCO STOCKTON 80,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
CO STATELINE ANHYDROUS AMMONIA PLANT HOLYOKE 2,590,673 Ammonia (anhydrous)
CT CYTEC INDUSTRIES INC., WALLINGFORD CT PLANT WALLINGFORD 2,080,500 Formaldehyde (solution)
DC BLUE PLAINS WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT WASHINGTON 180,000 Chlorine
DE DUPONT - EDGE MOOR, DE FACILITY EDGE MOOR 9,825,600 Chlorine
FL IMC-AGRICO COMPANY, PORT SUTTON TERMINAL TAMPA 100,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
GA PCS PHOSPHATE GARDEN CITY 98,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
HI BREWER ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRIES, LLC -BARBERS PT. KAPOLEI 120,000 Chlorine
IA FARMLAND INDUSTRIES, FORT DODGE NITROGEN PLANT FORT DODGE 180,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
ID AGRIUM CONDA PHOSPHATE OPERATIONS SODA SPRINGS 1,220,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
IL ET-4 TRILLA TERMINAL [?] MATTOON 140,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
IN HUNTINGTON TERMINAL HUNTINGTON 150,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
KS FARMLAND INDUSTRIES, INC-DODGE CITY NITROGEN PLANT DODGE CITY 120,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
KY HENDERSON TERMINAL [?] HENDERSON 90,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
LA TAFT TERMINAL TAFT 240,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
MA SOLUTIA INC., INDIAN ORCHARD PLANT SPRINGFIELD 2,600,000 Vinyl acetate monomer
MD HAWKINS POINT PLANT BALTIMORE 1,800,000 Chlorine
ME HOLTRACHEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY [Closed Sept 2000]

S.D WARREN (WESTBROOK MILL) [?]

ORRINGTON

WESTBROOK

416,000

360,000

Chlorine

Chlorine

MI CF INDUSTRIES, INC. - PORT HURON TERMINAL KIMBALL 60,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
MN CF INDUSTRIES, INC. - GLENWOOD TERMINAL GLENWOOD 120,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
MO LAROCHE INDUSTRIES, INC. CRYSTAL CITY OPERATIONS [?] FESTUS 60,012,570 Ammonia (anhydrous)
MS MISSISSIPPI CHEMICAL CORPORATION [?] YAZOO CITY 76,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
MT MONTANA SULPHUR & CHEMICAL COMPANY NE OF BILLINGS 3,080,000 Hydrogen sulfide
NC BORDEN CHEMICAL, INC., FAYETTEVILLE PLANT FAYETTEVILLE 3,000,000 Formaldehyde (solution)
ND CF INDUSTRIES, INC. - GRAND FORKS TERMINAL GRAND FORKS 120,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
NE FARMLAND INDUSTRIES, INC. - HASTINGS TERMINAL HASTINGS 140,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
NH HAMPSHIRE CHEMICAL CORPORATION NASHUA 945,655 Hydrocyanic acid
NJ GENERAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION NEWARK 5,000,000 Oleum (Fuming Sulfuric acid)
NM NEW MEXICO ADHESIVES, L.L.C. LAS VEGAS 2,675,000 Formaldehyde (solution)
NV COASTAL CHEM, INC. - BATTLE MOUNTAIN, NEVADA BATTLE MOUNTAIN 6,100,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
NY OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION - NIAGARA PLANT NIAGARA FALLS 17,000,000 Chlorine
OH PCS NITROGEN OHIO L. P. LIMA 125,938,200 Ammonia (anhydrous)
OK FARMLAND INDUSTRIES, INC., ENID NITROGEN PLANT ENID 120,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
OR RIVERGATE TERMINAL PORTLAND 101,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
PA DYNO NOBEL INC. (DONORA PLANT) DONORA 18,022,528 Ammonia (anhydrous)
RI TANNER INDUSTRIES, INC. [?] EAST PROVIDENCE 514,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
SC NATIONAL STARCH AND CHEMICAL COMPANY WOODRUFF ENOREE 3,900,000 Vinyl acetate monomer
SD BATH FACILITY, STATION #19 ABERDEEN 2,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
TN OLIN CORPORATION, CHARLESTON TN PLANT [?] CHARLESTON 26,000,000 Chlorine
TX NECHES INDUSTRIAL PARK,INC. BEAUMONT 89,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
UT LAROCHE INDUSTRIES, INC. - GENEVA NITROGEN PLANT OREM 8,558,812 Ammonia (anhydrous)
VA ALLIED SIGNAL - HOPEWELL PLANT HOPEWELL 40,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
VT ST. ALBANS PLANT [Ben & Jerry's] ST. ALBANS 31,410 Ammonia (anhydrous)
WA KENNEWICK PLANT - HEDGES AREA KENNEWICK 100,200,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)
WI BORDEN CHEMICAL, INC., SHEBOYGAN PLANT SHEBOYGAN 750,000 Formaldehyde (solution)
WV DUPONT WASHINGTON WORKS

High-resolution photo from DEP, State of WV:

http://cryptome.org/chem/dupont-001.jpg (1.7MB)

PARKERSBURG 28,000,000 Formaldehyde (solution)
WY COASTAL CHEM, INC. - CHEYENNE WYOMING CHEYENNE 67,000,000 Ammonia (anhydrous)